1825

A small wood and brick house is built on the corner of Murray and Smith.

It is rumoured that Andrew Keegan purchased it 20 years later to move it to its current location at 175 de la Montagne.

1845

The neighbourhood is now home to dozens of manufacturing plants that, together with the bells of St-Ann Church, create a unique auditory experience for neighbourhood residents.

The sweat from the hardworking Irish, English, and Scottish immigrants are a symbol of the industrial revolution that make the metal, wood, leather, chemical, railway, and agri-food industries boom.

1880

The 1870s are a difficult time marked by a global recession.

In 1880, the economy gains steam again and expansion works at the Canal are almost completed. The opening of the Grand Tronc railway that will link the city to Chicago and the American Midwest markets ushers in an era of hope.

1915

The Port of Montreal is completely revamped and Griffintown’s population grows as industrialization continues to expand.

But life remains hard as the Great War rages on.

1970

The Lachine Canal closes its locks, St-Ann Church closes its doors, and the neighbourhood is reclassified as industrial, due to a lack of residents.

Vestiges of the church can still be found at St-Ann Park where you’ll find its foundations and a few of its benches.

2004

The City of Montreal lists Griffintown among the 26 detailed planning sectors in its urban plan, titled the “downtown urban project”.

2015

Maître Carré launches the Brickfields project, the smallest multi-purpose tower in Montreal.

A project that combines the past and the present by repurposing Keegan House into a lobby for residents.

Find out more about Griffintown's future
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199, DE LA MONTAGNE
MONTRÉAL (QUÉBEC) H3C 2A6
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